2016 Meeting Minutes

Central Oregon Coast NOW Meeting Minutes

Newport High School Library

November 29, 2016

The chapter had no regular meeting scheduled for November because of the annual dinner, this year located at the Deep End Café in Newport on November 17, 2016. Since the election of Donald Trump for president, however, interest in the local chapter of NOW has never been higher. Attendance at the annual dinner was three times the past two years, and membership has doubled in only three weeks. With that interest, a special meeting, beginning with a finger-food potluck, was organized.

Sheila Swinford called the meeting to order at 6:30 pm after 30 minutes of sharing food and conversation. Approximately 70 people were in attendance. She explained that people would break into smaller groups based on individual interests after the announcements.

Announcements:

Franki Trujillo-Dalbey: KYAQ, the only community public radio station in Lincoln County, needs donations and sustaining members to continue broadcasting. All monies go to paying the bills; the station has no paid staff. One fundraiser is scheduled for Sunday, December 4, 5:00-8:00 pm at Café Mundo in Newport. Cost is $15 for the food and music; raffle tickets for a candelabra by Sam Briseno also sell for $10 each. Anyone interested in doing local programming should contact KYAQ, 541-264-5917.

Nancy Mead: “The Space between Us: Immigration, Refuges & Oregon,” a lecture by Manuel Padilla, is at the OCCC Community Room on December 1, 7:00-8:00 pm. The state NOW convention will be in Newport on April 9. Mead also called for people to phone in support of Foster Campbell, Louisiana Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate, in the election on December 10, 2017.

Rebecca Austen: Diversity groups are organizing a Women’s March on January 21, the day after the presidential inauguration, in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington that supports the rights of minorities in the United States.

Rhonda Harmon: A movement across the country is calling on people to wear safety pins to indicate that the wearer wants minorities to be safe.

Sheryl Eldridge: The February 26, 2017 meeting will be at the Newport Public Library to hear Jane Kirkpatrick discuss her book A Light in the Wilderness and its subject, Letitia Carson, the first black person to regain property through legal means. Born a slave, she came to Oregon in 1845 with Irish immigrant David Carson. After his death in 1852, Oregon law kept her from inheriting his land, and the 1862 Homestead Act permitted her to file a claim for 160 acres in Douglas County. The claim was certified in 1869.

David Gomberg: The state representative discussed the importance of elections and vigilance.

Swinford explained the different choices of small groups: electing women candidates, Ceasefire, STEM, women’s health, vulnerable populations, Diversity Coalition, environment, sexual violence, children, and legislative action. People are asked to sign up for one or more on the poster boards in the room. Jen Martin explained STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), described last summer’s Earthquake Camp for middle-school girls, and gave possible goals such as a workshop during the August 2017 total eclipse and facilitation of college mentorships. Monica Kirk explained the purpose of Ceasefire to create gun safety, and Cohen talked about Oregon being a sanctuary state, meaning that the state does not profile or use state and local resources for federal apprehension of undocumented immigrants. Nel Ward talked about the importance of monitoring and publicizing legislation.

Group reports:

Monica Kirk: Ceasefire will meet at the library on December 14, 2016, 2:00-4:00 pm.

Michele Walters:  Women Candidates will meet in December to determine methods of identifying women for running for office.

Nancy Mead: The women’s health committee will call a meeting.

Jen Martin: STEM will make plans for workshops, mentoring, and working with youth in programming robotics.

Brittany Kosydar: The group on sexual assault will work on resources to raise awareness, build more support groups, hold an event in April (Sexual Assault Awareness Month), and monitor rape kit processing.

Brenda Wills: The work with vulnerable populations and Diversity Coalition will work with the legislative committee.

Poverty: The group will concentrate on food and child care issues.

Nel Ward: Legislative Committee determined areas of interest, identified Marta West as a trainer to explore resources, and immediately work on the spraying ballot measure on the Lincoln County May ballot.

The meeting was adjourned at 8:45 pm.

Next Meeting: 6:00-8:00 pm, January 24, 2017, PUD Meeting Room, 2129 North Coast Highway, Newport, Oregon.

Respectfully submitted by

Nel Ward, Secretary

Central Oregon Coast NOW Meeting Minutes

PUD Meeting Room, Newport

October 25, 2016 Annual Meeting

The meeting was called to order at 6:10 pm by President Sheila Swinford.  Approximately 15 people were in attendance.

Treasurer’s Report was made by Treasurer Michele Walters.

Program:  Gillian Losh, who does Outreach for My Sisters’ Place discussed some of their programs and also addressed a concern about the way the local press handled a recent assault.  Gillian talked about MSP’s new Sanctuary housing fund.  There was also follow-up discussion concerning our county jail not allowing in-person visits and the traumatic effect this policy can have on families.

Election of Officers and Discussion of Bank Account Signers:  The nominating committee presented the following slate of officers for 2017:  President – Sheila Swinford; Vice President – Linda Aquirre; Secretary – Franki Trujillo – Dalbey; Treasurer – Sheryl Eldridge.  There were no nominations from the floor.  A vote was taken on the slate; the slate was unanimously voted on by all members present eligible to vote.  Franki Trujillo-Dalbey will replace Nel Ward as Secretary, and Sheryl Eldridge will replace Michele Walters as Treasurer; Sheila Swinford and Linda Aguirre will both serve second terms as President and Vice President, respectively; Linda Aguirre replaced Janice Eisele as Vice President on January 1, 2016; it was agreed that Janice Eisele should be removed as a “signer” on Chapter bank accounts.  Nancy Campbell Mead will continue in the office of Past President.  The same officers, based on the Central Oregon Coast NOW Foundation Bylaws were also elected to be Officers of the Central Oregon Coast NOW Foundation; additional board members of the Foundation elected are Nel Ward, Michele Walters, and Cynthia Jacobi.  Because Nel Ward is no longer an officer of the Foundation it  was agreed she should be removed as a signer on the Foundation bank account (she was never a signer on the Chapter bank account); as Executive Direction of the Foundation, it was agreed that Nancy Campbell Mead will remain a signer on the Foundation bank account.

Next Meeting:  Annual Dinner, November 17, 2016 @ 6:00 pm at the Deep End Cafe.

The Meeting was adjourned at 8:10 pm.

Respectfully submitted by,

Nancy Campbell Mead – Acting Secretary (Past President)

Central Oregon Coast NOW Meeting Minutes

PUD Meeting Room, Newport

September 27, 2016

The meeting was called to order at 6:15 pm by President Sheila Swinford. Approximately 15 people were in attendance.

Treasurer’s Report (Michele Waters):  Membership Account – $2,200.00.

Program: Sheila Swinford conducted a group discussion on the results from “Listen to Her” by handing out copies of the reports “Eight to Celebrate” and “Eight that Can’t Wait” from the Women’s Foundation of Oregon.

Some folks were concerned that Oregon has the highest rates of domestic violence in the nation, and the highest rates of depression, violence, PTSD, and alcohol use. The high rate of domestic violence was discussed and the question was asked, “When a woman calls the police, is she believed?” The Newport Police doesn’t have any front-line female officers, and since Newport is getting a new Police Chief, members were wondering if COC NOW can be involved in the hiring decision, along with other groups such as My Sister’s Place.

There was concern that young women might not have a safe person to talk to about domestic or sexual violence (DV) and we discussed if school nurses, or victim’s advocates are available. Native American women are impacted by DV more than other women in Lincoln Co. An idea surfaced that perhaps COC NOW might want to explore writing a grant to educate police and other first responders as there seems to be inadequate resources for care.

Dave Gomberg, State Representative, brought up problems with adequate mental health services for our increasingly aging population, made up mostly of women. Caregiving is a problem as most of them are women, and these jobs pay barely minimum wage, and if a woman hasn’t worked or made much money, her Social Security payments will be very low, with some women having to choose between paying rent or paying for their medications. What could be done? New legislation regarding equality and fairness was mentioned.

The discussion turned to the conditions at the Lincoln Co. Jail. We discussed the inability of family members to visit in person at the jail, as they now can only talk with their family member over the internet. This is problematic for folks without computers and the library isn’t equipped to help them all use library computers. And, if someone does have a computer and internet access, they still have to pay a fee to get set up with the jail. This is true for phone calls also. Inmates and families have to pay a fee to get an account set-up just to talk to their loved one.

Other issues raised was the need for more permanent housing for women impacted by DV, reproductive health in Lincoln County, the availability of abortions, and the need to recruit more female candidates for public offices. One of the members mentioned that a woman who had been sexually assaulted could not get a rape kit and examination performed in Lincoln Co., because the only person trained was off work, and she had to go to Corvallis to get it done, and before she could even shower. This led to a discussion about the need for more trained hospital and police personnel to address these issues.  David Gomberg mentioned that he was meeting with the hospital the next day and would bring up this issue.

Gillian from My Sister’s Place reported that there is an active Sexual Violence Assault Team that meets regularly and they act like an interagency case management team that includes Legal Aid, My Sister’s Place, Law Enforcement, the DA’s office, PFLAG, among other groups. When asked what the greatest need is in Lincoln Co., with regard to DV, housing is the number one need. Lola Jones from Samaritan House will be building units in South Beach for families. And other agencies and municipalities have housing as a priority need. Gillian also announced that October is DV Awareness Month, and there are many activities planned for Oct.

At this time, it was decided to explore these topics a bit before deciding which to work on and how to approach forming committees and so on.

Announcements:

National NOW Conference in D.C.: Nancy Campbell Mead reported on her trip last June to the 50th Anniversary of the National NOW conference in D.C. Nancy was voted in as one of three national NOW board members from the Pacific District (the District includes Oregon, California, Washington, Hawaii, and Alaska). The NOW board identified three action areas for chapters to choose from, if they want to participate. The three areas are: 1. Passage of the ERA (1-year goal), 2. Reproductive Justice Committee (Nancy is on this one), and 3. Sex Abuse/School to Prison Pipeline.

Lincoln Co. School District change in dress codes for girls: Portland Public Schools have changed their dress code for girls dramatically. Lincoln Co. School District has also changed theirs to essentially say, “wear appropriate clothing.”

Celebration of Women, Wine and Chocolate: This event is scheduled for October 9, at the Newport Performing Arts Center from 2 to 4 pm. Volunteers are needed for set up and clean up. Nancy will contact Virginia Gibbs to see if Centro de Ayuda wants to have a table. KYAQ will have a table for the first time.

Next Meeting: NOW Annual Meeting 6:00 to 8:00 pm, October 25, 2016, PUD Meeting Room, 2129 North Coast Highway, Newport, Oregon.

Respectfully submitted by

Franki Trujillo-Dalbey, Secretary

Central Oregon Coast NOW Meeting Minutes

PUD Meeting Room, Newport

August 23, 2016

The meeting was called to order at 6:06 pm by Sheila Swinford. Thirty-two people were in attendance. This was a joint meeting with the Lincoln County Democratic Party.

Treasurer’s Report (Michele Walters): Membership account – $2,252.93; Central Oregon Coast Foundation – $5,393.70.

Program: Nancy Mead introduced speaker, Jillian Schoene, executive director of EMERGE Oregon which identifies, trains, and encourages Democratic women to run for office, get elected, and seek higher office in a seven-month program. (http://www.emergeor.org/about). Schoene described the process and successes of the program.

Oregon State Rep. David Gomberg talked about the women he knows in Oregon political leadership and the importance of electing more women. He said that he was meeting with the Tina Kotek, speaker of the Oregon House, and asked for $1,000 from those attending the meeting to give to her for campaigns. Over half the senators—16 of them—are up for re-election. Of these, four incumbents, one Republican and three Democrats, are not running for re-election in 2016.

Announcements:

Celebration of Women: Nel Ward asked for people to obtain donations, both money and items for the silent auction, and Mead discussed the value of the Central Oregon Coast NOW Foundation’s donation program.

Aerial Spraying: Janet Johnson talked about the ballot measure on November’s ballot to stop spraying of pesticides.

Oregon League of Women Voters: Jean Cowan was introduced as the new president.

Black Women’s Equal Pay Day: Mead announced that August 23 is the day in 2016 that black women finally make the same amount of money that men do by combining their 2015 wages with the first almost eight months of 2016.

Women’s Suffrage Day: Ward noted that August 26 is the 96th anniversary of women gaining the vote in United States federal elections.

The meeting was adjourned at 7:25 pm.

Next Meeting: 6:00-8:00 pm, September 27, 2016, PUD Meeting Room, 2129 North Coast Highway, Newport, Oregon.

Respectfully submitted by

Nel Ward, Secretary

Central Oregon Coast NOW Meeting Minutes

PUD Meeting Room, Newport

June 27, 2016

The meeting was called to order at 6:01 pm by Sheila Swinford. Twenty people were in attendance.

Treasurer’s Report (Michele Walters): Membership account – $2,175.08; Central Oregon Coast Foundation – $7,128.81.

Program, “Women and Trauma”: Joanne Kittel and Swinford led a discussion regarding the impact of PTSD in women’s lives as part of PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome) Month in June. Kittel is a retired psychiatric social worker who specialized in the field of trauma, working separately with victims and perpetrators; she has been a community leader in treatment and services for battered women. Swinford is a retired mental health counselor and formerly the leader of a State Certified Outpatient Mental Health Agency; she has done extensive volunteer work in trauma treatment and services.

Swinford talked about PTSD being a symptom of what is happening in our culture. Kittel defined PTSD as the long-term effects and damage from a single or series of horrible occurrences that manifest themselves later. The result for women is shame, loss of self-esteem, withdrawal, and lack of trust. The way to escape continued abuse is support from others and plans to do so. As one participant said, most women try to escape seven times before they succeed. Suggestions for helping women with PTSD included researching local support groups, finding models for support groups that could be brought to Lincoln County, providing input into law enforcement through selecting leadership and meeting with them, and discussing women’s PTSD support groups with the local health district. Kittel said that the best answer is to have battered women start a core group of three or four members and get help from her, Swinford, Lisa Norton from MSP, or other qualified people. She suggested that some of the women at the meeting initiate this group.

Announcements:

Janet Johnson passed a petition to put a measure banning aerial spraying on the November 2016 ballot. There will also be a meeting about the project on June 30. Information at 541-574-9203.

Robin Hochnitt offered a DVD of Michael Moore’s new movie, Where to Invade Next, about Europe’s socialism.

The meeting was adjourned at 7:50 pm.

Next Meeting: July 30, 2:00-5:00 pm – joint potluck with Lincoln County Democrats at Beverly Beach State Park Big Yurt (north of Newport on Hwy. 101). There will be no regular COC NOW meeting in July.

Respectfully submitted by

Nel Ward, Secretary

Central Oregon Coast NOW Meeting Minutes

PUD Meeting Room, Newport

May 24, 2016

The meeting was called to order at 6:10 pm by Sheila Swinford. Sixteen people were in attendance.

Treasurer’s Report (Michele Walters): Membership account – $2,106.40; Central Oregon Coast Foundation – $7,128.81.

Program: Virginia Gibbs showed the 44-minute film Abrazos, a documentary about the transformational journey of a group of U.S. citizen children who travel from Minnesota to Guatemala to meet their grandparents for the first time, and led a discussion afterwards.

Discussion items:

Sheila Swinford discussed a method of setting up teams to gather raffle donations.

Committees:

Celebration of Women: Swinford distributed a form asking people to get objects for the silent auction; Nancy Mead announced that entertainment will be the band Three Twins and a Fish. The Celebration, a fundraiser for the Central Oregon Coast Foundation, is scheduled for October 9, 2:00-4:00 pm.

Health Committee: The showing of the film Trapped at the Lincoln City Bijou Theater was well received. The film netted half the cost of its rental.

Announcements:

June 15, 5:00-7:00 pm: World Elder Abuse Day panel at Samaritan’s Center for Health Education (740 SW 9th St, Newport).

Ceci Pratt announced that she had resigned from My Sister’s Place and would be moving away from the area in another week. Gillian Losh will be representing MSP for COC NOW.

The Central Oregon Coast NOW Foundation donated $500 to help fifth-grade girls travel to New Orleans to participate in a national engineering competition. Nancy Mead read thank-you notes from some of the girls. Nel Ward suggested that NOW contact Liz Fox at Newport for information in helping teachers establish funding procedures for future competitions.

Nancy Mead collected t-shirts for an upcoming local Ceasefire display about how many people have died in gun violence on June 18.

The meeting was adjourned at 9:05 pm.

Next Meeting: 6:00-8:00 pm, June 27, 2016, PUD Meeting Room, 2129 North Coast Highway, Newport, Oregon. There will be a presentation on PTSD in women for PTSD Awareness Month in June.

Respectfully submitted by

Nel Ward, Secretary

Central Oregon Coast NOW Meeting Minutes

PUD Meeting Room, Newport

April 26, 2016

The meeting was called to order at 6:00 pm by Sheila Swinford. Twenty-five people were in attendance.

Treasurer’s Report (Michele Walters): Membership account – $1,900.87; Central Oregon Coast Foundation – $6,903.35.

Program: Michele Stranger-Hunter, Executive Director of NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon and the Oregon Foundation for Reproductive Health, gave a presentation on “Access to Reproductive Medical Care in Oregon.” A blog on the talk, with additional information identified by links, is available here:
https://nelsnewday.wordpress.com/2016/05/02/women-not-protected-from-unintended-pregnancies-should-have-the-right-to-abortions/

Discussion items:

Cyndi Jacobi asked for ideas for upcoming meetings. Some suggestions were presentations by political candidates, recruiting women for political candidates, and a presentation on developing an organization that will combine nonprofit groups to build a child care center.

Sheila Swinford suggested an informal monthly meeting to discuss different issues of interest to NOW members. The discussion was a follow-up to comments about the success of the April 12 (Un)Happy Hour to commemorate Equal Pay Day that attracted a number of people.

Committees: STEM – Janice Eisele announced the free, three-day Earthquake Camp at the Oregon Coast Community College North County Campus in Lincoln City on July 18-20, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. each day, sponsored by the Central Oregon Coast NOW Foundation with funding from the Siletz Tribal Charitable Contribution Fund. Eisele said that the committee is considering a Girls Coding Camp as a project for next year.

Announcements:

May 1: Diane Eckstein: The LC Democrats are celebrating the traditional day of labor from 4:00 to 6:00 pm at the Toledo Union Hall, AWPPW 13, 138 NW 1st Street, Toledo. Called “Bread and Roses,” the event will feature live music of traditional labor and folk songs, food, and speakers talking about the labor movement. The cost is $15.

May 7 – Mead: COC NOW will sponsor the second annual Mother’s Day 5K Run. The race begins at the Newport Performing Arts Center at 9:00 am. Mead collected names of volunteers to work the event. They were asked to be at the PAC by 8:30 am. Registration information: http://ardoradventures.com/Mothers-Day-Run/

May 7 – Franki Trujillo-Dalbey: KYAQ 91.7 FM is sponsoring a presentation by David Barsamian as part of his tour, “Saving the Planet.” The fundraising event for Lincoln County’s only public radio station is 6:00-8:00 pm at Atonement Lutheran Church (2315 N. Hwy 101, Newport) and includes music by the Sunset

Central Oregon Coast NOW Meeting Minutes

PUD Meeting Room, Newport

March 23, 2016

The meeting was called to order at 6:05 pm by Sheila Swinford. Thirty-nine people were in attendance.

Treasurer’s Report (Michele Walters): Membership account – $1,857.69; Central Oregon Coast Foundation – $6,903.35.

Program: John Alymer gave a presentation on Frances Perkins, first woman Cabinet member and Secretary of Labor under Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Discussion items:

April 12 is Equal Pay Day, the day of the year when women catch up to the men’s salaries for the previous year. Nancy Mead suggested an (Un)Happy Hour to commemorate the event. Ceci Pratt will contact places for possible locations for the event.

In the most recent legislation, state Rep. David Gomberg voted to replace statuary in the U.S. capitol with Mark Hatfield instead of Abigail Scott Duniway, as a commission had recommended. Because Senate Leader Peter Courtney did not put the bill from the House on the senate floor, the bill died. It is assumed that the issue will be taken up in the 2017 legislature. Nel Ward recommended that COC NOW send a letter of appreciation to Courtney and a request to Gomberg that he support Duniway for this honor when the issue arises.

Michele Walters addressed the current issue of aerial spraying, saying that Oregon has lost $1.2 million for not taking care of its watersheds. NOAA is currently trying to get the state to protect the coho salmon because Oregon is worse than the surrounding states of California, Washington, and Idaho in this respect.

Gary Lahman discussed a recent report from the Robert Wood Health Foundation and said that Lincoln County is rated 29th out of the 36 Oregon counties. The report is available here: www.countyhealthrankings.org

Committees: The Legislative, Health, and Celebration of Women committees submitted written reports.

Announcements:

March 24 – George Polisner: Lincoln County will hold a Meet and Greet for U.S. Rep. candidate David McTeague at the Bay House in Lincoln City from 3:00-4:00 pm.

April 5 – Mead: The Women’s Foundation of Oregon will be in Newport to hold “Listen to Her,” a listening session on the status of women and girls in Oregon, at the Samaritan Center for Health Education in Newport from 7:00-8:30 pm. This is part of a state-side tour to prepare materials to positively influence legislation. Free food and child care are to be provided.

May 1 – Diane Eckstein: The LC Democrats are celebrating the traditional day of labor from 4:00 to 6:00 pm at the Toledo Union Hall, AWPPW 13, 138 NW 1st Street, Toledo. Called “Bread and Roses,” the event will feature live music of traditional labor and folk songs, food, and speakers talking about the labor movement. The cost is $15.

May 7 – Mead: COC NOW will sponsor the second annual Mother’s Day 5K Run. The race begins at the Newport Performing Arts Center at 9:00 am. Registration information:
http://ardoradventures.com/Mothers-Day-Run/

May 14 – Mead: COC NOW will sponsor the film Trapped at the Bijou in Lincoln City at 11:00 am. The documentary follows clinic workers and lawyers who are on the front lines of the battle to keep abortion safe and legal for millions of American women. Tickets are $7 at the door and $6 in advance. https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_flow&SESSION=U2zfnAd9aZppzVL9u1q17bJq0rV-XueLgLLrhQUjdJmQbOrsbc3klquTCWG&dispatch=50a222a57771920b6a3d7b606239e4d529b525e0b7e69bf0224adecfb0124e9b61f737ba21b0819826d26d01da88cb4fd8cb90b3a8c529af

May 24 (COC NOW meeting at PUD): A showing of the film Abrazos, a documentary about the transformational journey of a group of U.S. citizen children who travel from Minnesota to Guatemala to meet their grandparents for the first time.

Monica Kirk announced that the Newport Police Department is taking applications for its 10-week Citizens Police Academy, open to 25 people. She took the training for voluntary service and found it to be very effective in networking with the police.

Ceci Pratt had several announcements about My Sisters’ Place (MS):

  • April is Sexual Awareness Month; MSP will be reading proclamations at each city council meetings in the county and at the county commissioner meeting.
  • Throughout the county, 33 teal ribbons will be displayed to represent the 32 clients affected by sexual assault in 2015. MSP will also host library displays.
  • Several MSP benefits will be available throughout the county, including “Awake to Rhythm” (Yachats), “My Sisters’ Soup & Bowls” (Lincoln City), showing of the film “The Hunting Ground” (Siletz), and several tabling events at OCCC and the Farmer’s Market. April 27 is Denim Day when people are asked to wear jeans to work to show support of survivors.
  • MSP will be changing its name and is looking for recommendations. At this time, it has changed the name of the crisis line to “HopeLine.”
  • Pratt will be leaving MSP within the next few months, and Gillian Losh will be taking on her responsibilities.

The meeting was adjourned at 8:10 pm.

Next Meeting: 6:00-8:00 pm, April 26, 2016, PUD Meeting Room, 2129 North Coast Highway, Newport, Oregon. Michele Stranger-Hunter, Executive Director of NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon and the Oregon Foundation for Reproductive Health, will lead a discussion on “Access to Reproductive Medical Care in Oregon.”

Respectfully submitted by

Nel Ward, Secretary

Central Oregon Coast NOW Meeting Minutes

PUD Meeting Room, Newport

February 23, 2016

The meeting was called to order at 6:00 pm by Sheila Swinford.

Treasurer’s Report (Michele Walters): Membership account – $1,762; Central Oregon Coast Foundation – $7,313.

Committee Reports:

Program (Cynthia Jacobi): March 22 meeting will feature a presentation about Frances Perkins, FDR’s U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933-1945 and the first woman appointed to the Cabinet. Jacobi will publish announcement.

STEM (Janice Eisele): A three-day earthquake camp will be at the Oregon Coast Community College North Campus (Lincoln City) on July 18-20, 2016. A second camp focused on astronomy may also be planned.

Ceasefire (Robin Hochtritt): The gun turn-in on February 6, 2016 was successful, with 54 unwanted guns relinquished, two of which had been stolen. She expressed thanks to the Newport Police Department and their volunteers who helped the event stay calm and smooth-running

Diversity (Swinford): NOW will show a film regarding diversity at its May 22 meeting.

Celebration of Women and Legislation: Sue Hardesty and Nel Ward submitted handouts to be posted on the COC NOW website.

Health Committee: A handout provided issues raised at the committee’s first meeting. Minutes will be posted on the COC NOW website.

Announcements:

Ceci Pratt said that the lack of trained nurse specialists may cause problems with collecting rape kits. One woman, refused treatment at the North Lincoln Samaritan Hospital ER, had to be transported to Corvallis for treatment and rape kit evidence collection.

Pratt also said that a webinar training on March 30, 2016 (10:00 am-12:00 pm) will focus on untested sexual assault kits. Training includes survivors’ needs and implications for advocacy.

Eisele said the Second Annual Mother’s Day Run is scheduled on May 7, 2016. She suggested a web page to focus on the event and will talk with Jen Martin about helping with this.

A discussion about the annual NOW dinner brought up a possible need for a larger venue.

The meeting was adjourned at 8:00 pm.

[Thanks to Robin Hochtritt for taking minutes.]

Next Meeting: 6:00-8:00 pm, March 22, 2016, PUD Meeting Room, 2129 North Coast Highway, Newport, Oregon

Respectfully submitted by

Nel Ward, Secretary

Central Oregon Coast NOW Meeting Minutes

Oregon Coast Community College Meeting Room (Central Campus), South Beach

January 26, 2016

The meeting was called to order at 6:07 pm by Sheila Swinford.

The focus of the meeting was viewing and discussing the 30-minute film “Behind the Emerald Curtain,” a documentary about aerial pesticide spraying in Oregon. After the film, Swinford and Rio Davidson moderated a discussion, and Alisha Kern gave a brief presentation. Approximately 100 people attended. No business was conducted.

Treasurer’s report: NOW account – $1,704.60; NOW Foundation account – $7,313.35.

The film gave information about the dangers of aerial pesticide spraying to watersheds and air, using Rockaway Beach as one example of this problem. Clearcuts permit sediment to gather in rivers, temperature of the water to rise because of no shade, and toxic chemicals to enter the water supply from spraying to eradicate any plants except Douglas fir. Dirt and chemicals in the water require the treatment of chlorine at a toxic level, and Rockaway Beach, where 82 percent of its watershed was logged and sprayed, had to spend $1.6 million to upgrade its water system. In 2014-15, 37 water systems in western Oregon sediment contamination exceeded safe water standards. Water along the entire Oregon Coast doesn’t meet water quality.

Between 1996 and 2007, 84 percent of private timber lands was sold by local families for out-of-state investments with big corporations cutting only for short-term profits and no concern for vastly increased lack of resources. The same period of time saw great decrease in local employment through saw mills as log exports went from one in ten to one in two.

In the past, a harvest tax supported local municipalities, but these taxes now revert to the timber industry. Washington State still receives this tax, but Oregon has lost $40 million every year.

Swinford described how her pregnant goats died, miscarried, or delivered deformed fetuses because of aerial spraying during their gestation period. Humans exposed to the endocrine disrupters in pesticides have the same problem as well as breast cancer. She recommended another documentary film, “Living Downstream,” and the book Poison Spring: The Secret History of Pollution and the EPA. 

A member of the audience stated that she had seen a large increase in the number of special education students in the past decades. Davidson said that Oregon has gone from the cutting edge of legislation that protected people to having the weakest laws in the Northwest.

Eight counties are each attempting to pass county ordinances to stop aerial pesticide spraying. Manual spraying would not be affected by the proposed ordinances. Lincoln County approved the title of the ordinance and published it in the News Times, so that any citizen of the county could object within the period of time allowed. Peter Bregman, on behalf of Oregonians for Food and Shelter, has filed a lawsuit against the proposed measure in Lincoln County. The case will be heard on February 29, 2016. If the ordinance is allowed to go forward, the sponsoring group, Citizens for a Healthy County, has until July to collect approximately 1,800 signatures.

The proposed ordinance is called “FREEDOM OF LINCOLN COUNTY FROM AERIALLY SPRAYED PESTICIDES.” Information about the ordinance and organization is available here: http://www.lincolncountycommunityrights.org/citizens-for-a-healthy-lincoln-county/

Another proposal is to pass a statewide law to allow local decisions regarding aerial spraying.

The meeting was adjourned at 7:35 pm.

Next Meeting: 6:00-8:00 pm, February 23, 2016, PUD Meeting Room, 2129 North Coast Highway, Newport, Oregon

Respectfully submitted by

Nel Ward, Secretary